Your Checklist Before IDFA Nerfing

Meiry Vaknin | August 4, 2020
VP of Partnerships

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably heard about Apple’s user privacy announcement making the IDFA accessible only on an opt-in app-by-app basis. 

Starting with iOS 14 (to be launched in September 2020), apps will need to receive opt-in from users in order to use the IDFA. This grants explicit permission to apps tracking users across their products under the AppTrackingTransparency (ATT) framework. This framework will manage access to the IDFA gained through user consent.  

Apple still has to answer many questions on the implementation of the ATT Framework and SKADNetwork. That said, it’s mission critical that mobile marketers begin preparing now for iOS14. Here are our recommendations for what you should do to prepare, as well as, advice on how to encourage users to opt-in for the IDFA as soon as today:

  • Update your Privacy Policy 

Start educating users about how you use their data if they opt-in to IDFA tracking. You should update your app’s privacy policy. You should also consider setting up a dedicated landing page explaining how users’ data is used, who it’s shared with and how it benefits them to opt-in. To allay users’ security concerns, also include information about how your app stores and protects their data.  

  • Educate users across channels about opting-in

Start generating awareness with your users about why opting-in is crucial for an enhanced experience. Disseminate information via push notifications, newsletters, in-app notifications and even re-engagement ads

  • Start testing your IDFA opt-in messaging

Work with your marketing team to figure out the best messaging to persuade users to give you permission to access their IDFA via the ATT framework. Reframe verbiage to highlight the pros of sharing your data, such as personalized in-app ads. Make it clear to users that their data will be secure if they opt-in.

Source: Twitter

Consider alternative opt-in notification flows. Instead of just throwing the pop-up to ask permission, show an explanation of what will happen with the data and why the users’ experience benefits from it. Take inspiration from the model used by news websites that ask users if they would rather have a paid subscription or ad-supported version of their site. 

Another idea is taking inspiration from the way the push token is handled by many apps. First, users see a screen from the developer explaining why push notifications will improve their experience. After this, a permission notification pops up. Similarly, apps could show the ATT pop-up after a screen explaining the value proposition of the app and opting in.

  • Create your own store of first-party data 

Find creative ways to incentivize users to register accounts using their email addresses. This will help you build up a store of first-party data. Email identifiers will allow you to build retargeting and lookalike lists in an IDFA-less future. Implement a signup flow that captures new users via a web-first flow (vs. an app-first flow). 

  • Focus on creatives

Focus more on creatives and assume that they might become the only marketing lever available to you. Also start orienting your team to a new reality in which the major networks base campaign construction on creative levers rather than levers of precision targeting or lookalikes. Build a backlog of divergent creative concepts to test and listen to the network’s feedback about whether these creatives have the potential to scale. Forgo smaller creative iterations and prioritize broader creative testing to maximize your testing efficacy. 

Takeaways

Apple still has to answer many questions on the implementation of the ATT Framework and SKADNetwork. That said, it’s mission critical that mobile marketers begin preparing now for the iOS14.

  • Update your Privacy Policy and consider setting up a dedicated landing page explaining how users’ data is used, who it’s shared with and how it benefits them to opt-in.
  • Provide users with education on the IDFA via push notifications, newsletters, in-app notifications and even re-engagement ads.
  • Test opt-in messaging that highlights how it benefits the user to opt-in and how their data will be securely stored.
  • Find creative ways to collect email addresses to build up a store of first-party data.
  • Focus more on creatives and assume that they might become the only lever available to you.